Louisiana Law Review Streamline Citation Manual

Louisiana Law Review

Streamlined Citation Manual

Revised for the Nineteenth Edition of The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation

Last Updated: August 2013

1. Adherence to The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation

It is the goal of the Louisiana Law Review to achieve citation accuracy and consistency throughout an entire issue. The Managing Editor of the Louisiana Law Review will make all final decisions about the citation format to be used.

Generally, the Louisiana Law Review follows the format and rules provided in The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation (19th ed. 2010) [hereinafter The Bluebook]. This manual provides a rule only where the practice of the Louisiana Law Review differs from The Bluebook. If no exception is provided, the rules of The Bluebook will apply. The proper citation format for Louisiana cases, codes, statutes, and administrative materials can be found in The Bluebook, Table T.1 on pages 243–44.

2. Typefaces for Citations

The Louisiana Law Review uses three different typefaces in citation: Times New Roman (plain text), Italics, and Large and Small Caps. Authors’ names appear in large and small caps for books. See The Bluebook Rule 2.1(b).

Ex. John F. Decker, The Varying Parameters of Obstruction of Justice in American Criminal Law, 65 La. L. Rev. 49 (2004).

Richard Kluger, Simple justice (1976).

John Eligon, Pro Basketball: Augustus is Top Pick in W.N.B.A, N.Y. Times, Apr. 6, 2006, at D6.

3. Article Headings

All articles published in the Louisiana Law Review should adhere to the following style and layout when dividing the article into sections, subsections, sub-subsections, etc. Note the distinction in style between common text and case names.

I. A History of Smith v. Jones (centered, small caps, italicize case names)

A. A History of Smith v. Jones (left margin, italicized, except case names)

        1. A History of Smith v. Jones (one tab indent, italicized, except case names)

        a. A History of Smith v. Jones (one tab indent, italicized, except case names)

For internal cross-references, the Louisiana Law Review adheres to the format provided in The Bluebook. See The Bluebook Rule 3.5. Note that periods, rather than parenthesis, are used when referring to subsections and sub-subsections.

Ex. See discussion infra Parts II.B.2, III.C.1.

See supra Part IV.A–B.

4. Proper Citation Format for Louisiana Cases

All Louisiana cases should be cited only to the Southern Reporter series, if available. If a case was not published in the Southern Reporter series, it should be cited to the appropriate reporter according to The Bluebook Table T.1.

Note that the Louisiana Law Review does not incorporate the public domain citation in citing Louisiana cases. There is no distinction in citation format for cases decided before or after 1993.

Ex. Smith v. Jones, 705 So. 2d 256 (La. 2002).

Smith v. Jones, 476 So. 2d 311 (La. Ct. App. 1992).

Also note that the Louisiana Law Review does not incorporate public domain citations for any other states. If The Bluebook indicates that a particular case should be cited using a public domain citation, instead cite the case as though the particular Bluebook rule did not exist.

Ex. Bangor Publ’g Co. v. Union St. Mkt., 706 A.2d 595 (Me. 1998).

5. Proper Year to Cite for Statutory Sources and Proper Form for Louisiana

Statutory Sources

Per Rule 12.3.2, the year cited for all statutory sources should be that of the bound, printed version. Cite to the year that appears on the spine of the volume, the year found on the title page, or the latest copyright year, in that order of preference. Do not cite to the latest copyright year found on Westlaw or Lexis.

Ex. Robinson-Patman Act, 15 U.S.C. § 13 (2000).

Note that Louisiana statutory sources should only be cited to the bound, hardback codifications (otherwise known as the “green books”), rather than the soft cover versions.

Ex. La. Civ. Code Ann. art. 2818 (2005).

Ex. La. Code Crim. Proc. Ann. art. 407 (2003).

6. Textual Reference to Louisiana Civil Code Articles and Revised Statutes

In the text of an article, Louisiana Code articles should be referred to as “Louisiana Civil Code article 2315” or “article 2315.” The same format should be used for references to articles in other Louisiana Codes.

In the text of an article, Louisiana statutes should be referred to as “Louisiana Revised Statutes section 9:3521.” Note that the spelling of “Statutes” has an “s” even when it is referring to only one statute.

7. Proper Citation for the Louisiana Civil Law Treatise

The proper citation for the Louisiana Civil Law Treatise is as follows:

Ex. Saul Litvinoff, Obligations § 134, in 5 Louisiana Civil Law Treatise 220 (2d ed. 2001).

Ex. Litvinoff, supra note 17, § 134, at 220.

Ex. Id. § 135, at 233.

8. Proper Citation Format for the Louisiana Administrative Code

The Louisiana Law Review deviates from The Bluebook for Louisiana source material when citing to the Louisiana Administrative Code. TheLouisiana Law Review cites to the title number, then the part number, then the section number, as they appear in the Code. Note that the Louisiana Law Review cites to these sections using Arabic numerals, even if they appear as Roman numerals within the Code itself.

Ex. La. Admin. Code tit. 51, pt. 1, § 105 (2008).

9. Proper Citation Format for Louisiana Session Laws

The Louisiana Law Review deviates from The Bluebook for Louisiana source material when citing to session laws in the Acts of the Louisiana Legislature. In addition to providing the year and page number for the particular session law, the Louisiana Law Review also provides the act number. The Acts of the Louisiana Legislature can be found on HeinOnline (under “Session Laws Library”) or on the 3rd floor of the LSU Law Library.

Ex. Act No. 765, 2008 La. Acts 2925.

10. Numbers, Fractions, and Percentages

 

The Louisiana Law Review deviates from The Bluebook for spelling out numbers in text and in footnotes. The Louisiana Law Review spells out numbers from zero to ten in textual sentences. For numbers greater than ten, use numerals. The Louisiana Law Review also spells out fractions. If text contains a percentage, do not write “percent” but instead use the numeral and the % sign.

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