2020-21 Symposia

Program Description

On Friday, March 5, 2021, the Louisiana Law Review will present its annual symposium, The Impact of the 15th and 19th Amendments on the 2020 Presidential Election: Voter Accessibility’s Battle Against Voter Suppression, virtually.

The Louisiana Law Review’s 2021 Symposium will explore the developmental history of the 15th and 19th Amendments as well as their impact on the most recent American presidential election.

In this Symposium, legal practitioners and scholars from across the country will gather on a virtual platform to discuss and analyze a variety of issues relating to the history of the 15th and 19th Amendments, inclusion and representation in elections, the difficulties of voting in times of pandemic and war, and the relationship of the Voting Rights Act with the 15th and 19th Amendments. The Symposium will feature renowned scholars and academics, including Professor Paul Finkelman, Professor Atiba Ellis, Professor Raymond Diamond, Dr. Laura Edwards, Professor Michael Morley, Professor Travis Crum, Professor Earl Maltz, Professor Lisa Manheim, and Professor Derek Muller.

Please join us on March 5, 2021, as we discuss issues impacting equal representation in our presidential elections.

This event can count for 4 CLE Credit Hours,
Course Title: Law Review Symposium on March 5, Course #: 5170210305

Registration Link: https://www.law.lsu.edu/forms/symposium/
LSU Law Symposium Website Link: https://www.law.lsu.edu/symposium/

Welcoming Address and Opening Remarks – Interim Dean Lockridge 12:00 – 12:15 P.M
Panel 1 – The Impact of the 15th and 19th Amendments on Inclusivity

Presenters:

  • Professor Atiba Ellis
  • Professor Raymond Diamond
12:15 – 1:15 P.M.
Panel 2 – Election Emergencies: Voting During Times of War and Pandemic

Presenter:

  • Professor Michael Morley

Commentators:

  • Professor Lisa Manheim
  • Professor Derek Muller
1:15 – 2:15 P.M.
Break 2:15 – 2:30 P.M.
Panel 3 – Historical Perspectives Panel

Presenters:

  • Professor Earl Maltz
  • Dr. Laura Edwards
2:30 – 3:30 P.M.
Panel 4 – Voting Rights Act Panel

Presenters:

  • Professor Paul Finkelman
  • Professor Travis Crum
3:30 – 4:30 P.M.

CONTACT

Louisiana Law Review
lawreview@law.lsu.edu
225/578-1683

 

2018-2019 Symposium



PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

2019 marks the 10th Anniversary of the law clinics at Louisiana State University. The clinics have had a substantial impact on the Law Center as well as reform of the legal system in Louisiana. The clinical programs at LSU provide students with a hands on experience that allows them to interact with clients, provide services to those who may not be able to afford it, and most importantly make a positive impact in the community. The focus of this symposium will address criminal justice reform in general and the influence that legal pedagogy can have on the reform of the criminal justice system.

In this Symposium, the LSU Law Center through the Louisiana Law Review, the LSU Law Clinics, and legal practitioners and scholars from across the country will gather to discuss and analyze these important, complex, controversial, and evolving legal issues. The Symposium features renowned scholars and academics, including Professor Doug Berman, Professor Fiona Doherty, Professor Andrea Armstrong, Professor Robert Mikos, Professor Michael Pinard, Professor Katherine Maris Mattes, Professor Aliza Kaplan, Professor Laura Cohen, Professor Danielle C. Jefferies, Professor Alex Kriet, and others, such as noted author and Professor Ekow Yankah. Professors and scholars from the Paul M. Hebert Law Center will moderate panels of these scholars and writers and assist us in addressing these issues.

Please join us as we explore criminal justice reform, the future of criminal justice reform, and the power clinical education programs can have on the reformation of the criminal justice system that is currently in place.

Panel 1: Clinical Education/Pedagogy and the Impact on Criminal Justice Reform

  • Fiona Doherty
  • Michael Pinard
  • Katherine Marris Mattes
  • Aliza Kaplan

Moderated by Professor Madalyn Wasilczuk

Panel 2: Drug Policy Reform and the Overall Impact on Criminal Justice Reform

  • Bruce Reilly
  • Professor Michael Malinowski
  • Alex Kreit

Moderated by Professor Raff Donelson

Panel 3: Prison Reform, Prisoner Rights, and Associated Policy Work

  • Andrea Armstrong
  • Laura Cohen
  • Danielle C. Jefferis
  • Nicole Godfrey

Moderated by Professor Lisa Avalos

Panel 4: Formerly Incarcerated Juvenile Offenders

Moderated by Professor Robert Lancaster

Panel 5: Call to Action: The Future of Prison Reform—National Movement of Criminal Justice Reform

  • Abbe Smith
  • Ekow Yankah
  • Betsy Ginsberg
  • Lila Meadows

Moderated by Professor Raymond Diamond

CONTACT

Louisiana Law Review
lawreview@law.lsu.edu
225/578-1683

2017-2018 Symposium



PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

2018 marks the 150th Anniversary of the enactment of the 14th Amendment, which the Supreme Court of the United States has interpreted to develop protections for many formerly unrepresented and unprotected persons in the nation. Developments in civil rights, equal protection, citizenship, and other areas of constitutional law arose out of its enactment and our nation is continually changed as a result.

In this Symposium, the LSU Law Center through the Louisiana Law Review, the Pugh Institute for Justice, and legal historians and scholars from across the country gather to discuss and analyze these important, complex, controversial, and evolving legal issues. The Symposium features renowned scholars and judges, including Professor Paul Finkelman, Professor Bertrall Ross, Professor Mark Summers, Professor D. Wendy Brown Scott, Professor Earl Maltz, Professor Orville Vernon Burton, Professor Seth Davis, Professor Nicholas Stephanopoulos, Professor Michael Higginbotham, Judge Bernice Donald, and others, such as noted author Keith Weldon Medley and journalist Alysa Landry. Professors and scholars from the Paul M. Hebert Law Center will moderate panels of these scholars and writers and assist us in addressing these issues.

Videos from the Symposium can be accessed by clicking each of the below segments.

Panel 1: History of the Fourteenth Amendment

  • Judge Bernice Donald, United States Circuit Judge for the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals
  • Professor Christopher Green, Associate Professor of Law and H.L.A. Hart Scholar in Law and Philosophy at the University of Mississippi School of Law
  • Professor Earl Maltz, Distinguished Professor at Rutgers School of Law
  • Professor Orville Vernon Burton, Creativity Professor of Humanities, Professor of History, Pan-African Studies, Sociology, and Computer Science at Clemson University
  • Keith Weldon Medley, Author of We as Freemen: Plessy v. Ferguson

Panel 2: Citizenship

  • Professor Paul Finkelman, Fulbright Chair in Human Rights and Social Justice at the University of Ottawa, Canada; John E. Murray Visiting Professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law
  • Professor Gabriel “Jack” Chin, Edward L. Barrett Jr. Chair and Martin Luther King Jr. Professor of Law at the University of California, Davis School of Law
  • Journalist Alysa Landry, Journalist and English Instructor at Navajo Technical University

Panel 3: Equal Protection

  • Professor Mark Summers, Thomas D. Clark Chair in History at the University of Kentucky
  • Professor Seth Davis, Assistant Professor of Law at University of California Irvine School of Law
  • Professor Bertrall Ross, Chancellor’s Professor of Law at Berkeley Law
  • Professor D. Wendy Greene, Professor at Samford Cumberland School of Law

Panel 4: Future of the Fourteenth Amendment

  • Professor Michael Higginbotham, Joseph Curtis Professor of Law and former Interim Dean, University of Baltimore School of Law
  • Professor Wendy Brown Scott, Professor of Law at North Carolina Central School of Law

CONTACT

Louisiana Law Review
lawreview@law.lsu.edu
225/578-1683

Blurring Lines: Emerging Trends and Issues in Sports and Gaming Law

Sports and Gaming Law:

What can NCAA athletes say on social media?

What is the future of fantasy football?

Are student athletes employees and should they be paid as such?

What law governs riverboat casinos?

On January 27, the LSU Law Center, the Pugh Center for Justice, and experts from across the country will discuss and analyze these complex issues in the sports and gaming industries. Please join us for this exciting Symposium. This Symposium qualifies for 7 free CLE credits in Louisiana and lunch is provided. See you there!

Register here: https://www.law.lsu.edu/symposium/